sexta-feira, 15 de agosto de 2008

Em Flor / Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day

É outra vez altura para o desafio mensal, lançado pelo blog May Dreams Gardens, de mostrar o que está em flor nos nossos jardins.
No meu jardim continuam a não abundar as flores. No entanto com a diminuição das temperaturas (principalmente durante a noite) muitas das plantas começam já a entrar novamente em crescimento. Talvez no proximo mês tenha mais para mostrar.

Once again its time for GBBD, hosted by May Dreams Gardens.
Things are still slow in my garden, but the slow decrease in temperature (particularly night temperature) is causing some plants to come out of their summer rest. Maybe next month I will have more to show.

jardim 4633
Salvia microphylla

jardim 4634
Ceratostigma plumbaginoides

jardim 4636
CaryopterisXcladonensis

jardim 4638
Croscomia sp

jardim 4639
Lavandula dentata

jardim 4640
Aloysia triphylla

jardim 4643
Lantana camara

jardim 4645
Plumbago auriculata

jardim 4646
Rudbeckia fulgida

jardim 4647
Verbena bonariense

jardim 4648
Punica granatum

jardim 4650
Bougainvillea glabra

jardim 4637
Tulbaghia violacea

jardim 4641
Achillea millefolium

23 comentários:

Roses and stuff disse...

Oh, but you have so many lovely blooms in your garden, despite the summer rest! I wish I could grow Plumbago - so nice!
/Katarina

Blackswamp_Girl disse...

For not a lot in bloom, Gintoino, you certainly have a lot of pretty flowers! September must be scheduled to bring you a real embarrassment of riches at this rate. :)

I like seeing what grows and blooms in different gardens around the world at different times of the year... and also how different plants grow in different climates. In regards to the latter, I have to comment that your ceratostigma looks to be SO tall! I have the same plant, but it holds its flowers down very close to the foliage, and never gets more than maybe 4" tall, even in bloom. How tall would you say yours gets?

gintoino disse...

Katarina, they look so many, but they are tinny, so in the garden they don't do much of a show. The plumbago would if it was larger (Still a very small plant)

blackswamp_girl, its one of the main reasons why I like to blog and visit garden blogs. Its so interesting to see what is growing and how things grow in other climates. My ceratostigma is about 25 inches high but if it gets more water it will be higher.

chuck b. disse...

I always imagine that your garden smells so good in the summer sun.

Pam/Digging disse...

I know exactly what you mean about those tiny blooms that don't make a big impact in the garden. But we hot-climate gardeners treasure them nonetheless, don't we? So many of your plants look like they'd be right at home in my Texas garden. Your garden looks great.

Jeff disse...

It all looks great, Gintoino. I love the single Punica- I assume that's the fruiting variety. I have nana, which does set small, seedy fruit, along with two taller double-flowering varieties - white and a pale orange double - which are purely ornamental. The single scarlet really pops! BTW - based on everything else you grow, I think your rain lilies will do great in the ground.

gintoino disse...

chuck b, most of my plants are herbs and aromatic plants, so whenever you touch a plant you can feel the perfume in the air. Smell is very important for me in the garden.

pam, we garden in similar climate I think so most of our plant could be grown in either garden. thank you for visiting and commenting.

gintoino disse...

jeff, thank you for visiting and commenting. Yes that is a fruiting variety of punica granatum. i will try the rain lilies in the ground then, thank you for the advise

Frances, disse...

Hi Gintoino, I love to wander around in your garden, the fragrance and meandering paths make for a delightful tour. I am envious of the punica also, and don't even care about the fruit, the color of the bloom draws me in. Thanks for these lovely shots.

Gail disse...

Such a beautiful garden, so delightfully Mediterranean with all the sun and heat and intense heat. It looks to me like your Rudbeckia is doing beautifully...I find the species is a hardier breed and can take the fullest sun. I wonder if you can get it mail order? It seems I must rethink my garden since the summers are getting less rain and hotter temps...I might have to try more of your beauties!

gail

Dama do Lago disse...

Ah, mas ainda arranjaste imensas flores para mostrar :)! Lindas!

Carol disse...

It's interesting how the heat of summer causes the plants to "rest". I'm looking forward to what the cooler temps bring to your garden, since there seem to be a lot of blooms this month!

Thanks for joining in for bloom day.
Carol, May Dreams Gardens

Rose disse...

I wish we could grow bougainvillea here--yours is gorgeous, especially against the white wall. Lots of lovely blooms!
Good luck with your "Naked Ladies," aka surprise lilies.

rusty in miami disse...

Great color on that Punica Granatum. We have many common flowers in our gardens

gintoino disse...

frances, the flowers are nice, but the fruits...hmmm the fruits!

gail, thank you for visiting and commenting. Seems like even in the cooler climates, things are getting warmer too.

Dama do lago, sempre se vai arranjando qualquer coisinha ;-)

carol, thank you for hosting GBBD. Things will look better next month (one can only hope)

rose, aren't we gardeners funny? We always want something we can't grow in our climates. I wish I could grow caladiums.

Mr. McGregor's Daughter disse...

That Agave (?) by the Salvia must be huge! I love how the blue of its foliage sets off the red of the Salvia. It's interesting that you grow both Ceratostigma plumbaginoides & Plumbago. They are both such beautiful shades of blue.

Annie in Austin disse...

Hello Gintonio,

As Pam/Digging noticed - Austin and Portugal gardeners can grow similar plants. In fact, I've seen every single one of the plants in your post growing here in Austin.

The big difference is that you have all these flowers collected in one garden, while I would have to visit 4 or 5 Austin gardens to find them all.

Your variety is amazing and the thought of cooler nights is very appealing!

Annie at the Transplantable Rose

gintoino disse...

mr. mcgregor's daughter, the afave is about 40inches...I wouldn't call it huge. It is a medium/small sized agave, by A. americana standarts.

annie in austin, our climates must be simmilar. However Austin blogs show some plants that I just can't find here. And some plants grow in diferent ways, for instance echinacea ,here,only starts to look good when temperatures drop a bit. In you blogs I see it look wonderful all summer long.

lisa disse...

I just LOVE your garden, even at rest! The flowers are very nice, but that agave is amazing!

Lisa at Greenbow disse...

The red of the flower in the first picture really pops in front of the blue agave. All of your flowers are gorgeous.

Mário Oliveira disse...

Vejo que tem alguma formação botânica, pois até escreve os nomes das espécies (género+restritivo) como deve ser, em itálico, género com maiúscula e restritivo com minúscula. Eu por acaso não dou grande valor a flores que ultrapassem rosas, cravos ou estrelicias, etc. Mas dedico-me mais às ervas, embora não seja alentejano. Mas esse amor à Botânica só lhe fica bem. Na minha licenciatura fiz essa cadeira por obrigação. Era anual e servia para apoio à Paleontologia, já que sou Geólogo.

Jennie disse...

Hey, Gintoino - Jennie from SFTF here. :) I finally posted about the carrot recipe you sent me so long ago! Many thanks again for the great recipe!

Also, wanted to comment that I'm growing so many of the same blooms in my garden right now...it's a surprise to me that our climates are so similar in August/September. Everything looks so lovely!! What seeds were you wanting to try for next year? I have a terrible memory so send me an email again if you want me to find something for you. :)

Ana Maria B disse...

Para poucas flores não está mal....